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Summary:
This is the homepage of the of the weekly Astrophysics journal club at the Division of Particle physics and astrophysics at the University of Helsinki.
The meetings are of an unofficial nature and the main driver is to get together and discuss recent interesting papers. This meeting differs from the
Seminar series in that people are not expected to talk about their own research and in that no credits will be awarded to students. The meetings are
open to everyone and the aim is to stimulate discussion about recent results and provide the possibility to
 learn about research that is not necessarily
connected to one's own field of expertise.

All topics are welcome ranging from planetary science to larger scales involving stellar
 astrophysics, Milky Way studies, galaxies and cosmology.
The only requirement is that the
 presented papers should be interesting to a wider audience and that they should be presented 
in such a way that also
a non-expert can follow the presentation. In the meetings we discuss one paper each week for about 45 minutes.
 All meetings are in English.

Location: Conference room C310 on the third floor.

Time: Thursdays at 10.15-11.00am during term time.

Speakers: Please contact Peter Johansson, Mikael Granvik or Clif Kirkpatrick if you want to present a paper.

Present Program: The next talk will be on the 17th of October

Presenter: Peter Johansson:
Paper title: Nobel prize in Physics 2019: Jim Peebles
Authors: Peebles, J.
Reference: Scientific background: Physical cosmology, 2019, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

Abstract: James Peebles’ insights into physical cosmology have enriched the entire field of research and laid a foundation for the transformation of cosmology over the last fifty years, from speculation to science. His theoretical framework, developed since the mid-1960s, is the basis of our contemporary ideas about the universe.

The Big Bang model describes the universe from its very first moments, almost 14 billion years ago, when it was extremely hot and dense. Since then, the universe has been expanding, becoming larger and colder. Barely 400,000 years after the Big Bang, the universe became transparent and light rays were able to travel through space. Even today, this ancient radiation is all around us and, coded into it, many of the universe’s secrets are hiding. Using his theoretical tools and calculations, James Peebles was able to interpret these traces from the infancy of the universe and discover new physical processes.

The results showed us a universe in which just five per cent of its content is known, the matter which constitutes stars, planets, trees – and us. The rest, 95 per cent, is unknown dark matter and dark energy. This is a mystery and a challenge to modern physics.


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