Skip to end of metadata
Go to start of metadata

     
  

Summary:
This is the homepage of the of the weekly Astrophysics journal club at the Division of Particle physics and astrophysics at the University of Helsinki.
The meetings are of an unofficial nature and the main driver is to get together and discuss recent interesting papers. This meeting differs from the
Seminar series in that people are not expected to talk about their own research and in that no credits will be awarded to students. The meetings are
open to everyone and the aim is to stimulate discussion about recent results and provide the possibility to
 learn about research that is not necessarily
connected to one's own field of expertise.

All topics are welcome ranging from planetary science to larger scales involving stellar
 astrophysics, Milky Way studies, galaxies and cosmology.
The only requirement is that the
 presented papers should be interesting to a wider audience and that they should be presented 
in such a way that also
a non-expert can follow the presentation. In the meetings we discuss one paper each week for about 45 minutes.
 All meetings are in English.

Location: Conference room C310 on the third floor.

Time: Thursdays at 10.15-11.00am during term time.

Speakers: Please contact Peter Johansson, Mikael Granvik or Clif Kirkpatrick if you want to present a paper.

Present Program: The next talk will be on the 5th of October

Presenter: Ghassem Gozaliasl
Paper title: Ten billion years of brightest cluster galaxy alignments
Authors: West, M. J., de Propris, R., Bremer, M.N., Phillipps, S.
Reference: 2017, Nature Astronomy, 1, 157

Abstract: A galaxy's orientation is one of its most basic observable properties. Astronomers once assumed that galaxies are randomly oriented in space; however, it is now clear that some have preferred orientations with respect to their surroundings. Chief among these are giant elliptical galaxies found in the centres of rich galaxy clusters. Numerous studies have shown that the major axes of these galaxies often share the same orientation as the surrounding matter distribution on larger scales1,2,3,4,5,6. Using Hubble Space Telescope observations of 65 distant galaxy clusters, we show that similar alignments are seen at earlier epochs when the Universe was only one-third of its current age. These results suggest that the brightest galaxies in clusters are the product of a special formation history, one influenced by development of the cosmic web over billions of years.

Present program:

 

Past program:

Autumn 2017:

Spring 2017:

Autumn 2016:

Spring 2016:

Autumn 2015:

Spring 2015:


Autumn 2014:

Spring 2014:

Autumn 2013:

Spring 2013:

Autumn 2012:

Spring 2012:

Autumn 2011:

  • No labels